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America

America Plays

Explore America’s favorite Taylor guitars.

514ce

Price: $2,799 USD

614ce

Price: $3,499 USD

814ce

Price: $3,499 USD

810

Price: $3,399 USD

America

America began when founding members Gerry Beckley and Dewey Bunnell (along with former bandmate Dan Peek) met in high school in London in the late 1960s and quickly harmonized their way to the top of the charts with their signature song, "A Horse With No Name." On the strength of that single, America became a global household name and paved the way with an impressive string of hits. Forty-plus years later, these friends are still making music together, touring the world and thrilling audiences with their timeless sound. Embracing a rainbow of divergent cultures, America's audiences continue to grow, comprising a loyal legion of first, second, and third generation fans, all bearing testament to the group’s enduring appeal. America's journey has found them exploring a wide variety of musical terrain. Their best-known tunes, which also include "I Need You," "Ventura Highway," "Don't Cross The River," "Tin Man," "Lonely People," and "Sister Golden Hair" illustrate America’s inimitable combination of Gerry Beckley's melodic pop rock and Dewey Bunnell's use of folk-jazz elements, slinky Latin-leaning rhythms, and impressionistic lyric imagery, all of which contrasted with Dan Peek's more traditional country-rock leanings and highly personal lyrics. America's albums—six certified gold and/or platinum, with their first greatest hits collection, History, hitting four-plus million in sales—display a fuller range of the trio's talents than their singles. Their material encompasses an ambitious artistic swath; from effects-laden rockers to oddball medleys to soul-bearing ballads, America displays a flawless blend of disparate genres and styles as wide-open as the great American plains.